Posts Tagged ‘On the Web’

How memorable are you?

July 17, 2009

A local gym in my neighborhood produces some of the most memorable and wittiest offline messaging I have ever seen. We get so carried away with the latest and greatest online tools like Twitter, that we forget about holistic marketing and forget to use offline channels in addition to the new media channels. If you are a brick-and-mortar business, you especially need to blend the two.

compensateOne of the guys who works in this neighborhood gym puts out a funny new slogan on a chalkboard right outside, every single day. Each and every day, it’s different and funny and almost always a bit edgy. Please see the picture to the left for this morning’s slogan. The guy who writes the messages saw me taking this picture and ran outside to introduce himself. We chatted briefly, and he asked me if I have a blog, and I told him that I was going to tweet and write about his messaging, because I thought it was very catchy. This type of messaging would translate very well into a medium like Twitter, because it’s short, pithy, funny and a conversation starter. I certainly hope that I can help him at least set up his social media presence.

The moral of the story is: be memorable and be everywhere. It sounds really simple, but most fail in executing on at least one of these points. Being memorable should be defined by your target demographic and the touchpoints at which they interact with your message. In this example, busy customers rushing to the train will likely not remember anything longer than the message from this picture. This chalkboard message successfully cut through the clutter, which is not an easy feat: these days we have as much clutter online as we do offline. Moreover, the catchy, witty messaging is just right for the young male demographic that they are targeting. As far as being everywhere: remember to be online and off. The temptation is to go chasing the latest tools, but communication with your customers is not about the tools, it’s about the message. Engage them where they are, in a way that they will remember.

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And… There Goes the Neighborhood…

May 25, 2009

neighborhoodI, like many others, have been concerned about the rise of spam on Twitter. First, spammers would book a user name, follow a bunch of users, In hopes of auto-follows, then auto-DM those users with spam links (this is why I never auto-follow). Then, there has been talk of spammers latching on to a trending hashtag with an irrelevant spam message containing a link to an unrelated site. I have no issue with self-promotion, as long as it’s done tactfully, and is designed to add value to the conversation. By latching on to a trending hashtag, a spammer will appear in the search timeline for anyone tracking that topic, and thus gain great visibility.

spamNow, last night, as I was following my twitter stream before going to bed, I came across this link to a “guru” site promising to amass tons of twitter followers fast. It made me vomit a little. Real estate scams, now Twitter scams? This is fueled by the rise of a blind race for users, fueled by users like Ashton Kutcher and others who amass followers like it’s some kind of a competitive sport. Amassing followers may be fun, if that’s your type of thing: a popularity contest of sorts. But if you are looking to build value for yourself and your followers via Twitter, you will be wrong to follow this path. The Twitter community is all about building long-term relationships, listening and engaging before you speak, being authentic and being human. The 30 second spot is fading in efficacy, and brands looking to really engage their hard-to-reach customers must not use Twitter as a 1-way broadcast system. Which is why I am disappointed by these developments, but also think that spammers will soon realize that Twitter is not the right medium for amassing tons of followers non-organically and blasting them with a 1-way message. As Brian Solis said in response to this development (via Twitter, of course), “Those driven by the # of followers will find themselves alone as social Darwinism ensures the survival of the loyal+helpful.” And remember that there are no shortcuts to success, only hard work and producing quality content. There is no such thing as an “automated Twitter traffic machine”.

These developments, while not surprising, disappoint me. I am not surprised, because Twitter has definitley jumped the shark, and all popular digital communication methods get invaded with spammers after they become popular. But it does make me a little sad to see this behavior going on in a medium that we have come to love for its community feel. I guess this is what happens when web products start to cross the chasm.

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How much should you listen to your customers

May 14, 2009

The recent upheaval in the Twittersphere regarding the new Twitter update dealing with @ replies has got me thinking over the past couple of days (in case you are not familiar with what the new Twitter update does, please read @whitneyhess’s blogpost which does a great job explaining it). Even though I am not going to rehash the details of the new update here, I will briefly mention that as a result, Twitter no longer shows you @ replies directed to people you don’t follow, even though you follow the writer of the tweet (this only happens when the handle of the person you don’t follow is the first word of the tweet).  I am not sure why Twitter did this; perhaps they were helping us reduce the noise that is produced by following everyone’s @ replies. However, this makes little sense, as you can adjust your settings from inside the Twitter.com site. What Twitter should’ve realized that a lot of users find @ replies beneficial to discovery of new users to follow. If someone I respect and engage with replies to someone else, I will take notice and at least click through to that person, and if I like him / her, make a decision to follow. Yes, there are ways to still explore these tweets via setting up a search in TweetDeck and other tools. However, by having everything come to my main feed, it was just that much easier. By taking the option away, Twitter has taken the ability to decide from its users.  If you give me an option to adjust what @ replies I see via settings tab, why take the decision away from me?

The above example shows that Twitter wasn’t particularly listening to its users and how they use the site.  Some companies pursue their strategy without paying much attention to what its users want. And sometimes it’s for good reason. This @ replies episode reminded me of a talk by 37Signals Jason Fried at last fall’s Web2.0 conference in NYC. Jason talked about how each product person / company needs to be a curator, carefully reviewing user suggestions for improvements, while implementing only those that make sense given the company’s strategy. This makes complete sense, especially as a company grows and acquires more users and thus more user feedback. And secondly, users don’t even know what they want most of the time. When they say they want something, sometimes it’s just a symptom of a larger problem they have to solve. As a business, you must figure out this larger problem and solve it, instead of solving by implementing piecemeal modules.

So the question still remains… When do you listen to your customers and when does not listening translate to anger (as in the Twitter example) and possible attrition?

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